UPDATE 2-Volatility drives away foreign investors from Brazil, but IPOs arouse interest

(Recasts, adds analyst comments)

SAO PAULO, Aug 20 (Reuters) – Foreign investors have sold off 20.3 billion reais ($5 billion) in Brazilian stocks so far this year, but the 13-year high in outflows has coincided with strong demand for several recent stock offerings, easing the gloom for some bankers.

The foreign investor selloff was the biggest since 1996, stock exchange parent company B3 SA Bolsa Balcao said on Tuesday. The selloff was driven mainly by increasing worries over the global economy.

Yet including acquisitions of shares in IPOs and follow-on offerings, many in companies with prospects for strong growth and efficiency gains, foreign investment flows actually showed a positive balance of 4.4 billion reais.

“There is a clear quest for high growth stories, companies going to the digital world or that might have very clear signs of efficiency gains,” said Juliano Arruda, head of Latin America equities sales at Goldman Sachs.

Since the beginning of the year, 19 IPOs and follow-on offerings raised 53.47 billion reais, with 25.57 billion reais coming from foreign investors, B3 data showed.

In July, for instance, foreign investors represented 45% of the 9.63 billion reais raised by state-run oil company Petroleo Brasileiro SA in the share offering of its fuel distribution unit, Petrobras Distribuidora SA.

“Resources might be coming out of one door (secondary market) and entering another (primary),” analysts at Planner wrote in a report.

Magali Bim, portfolio manager at asset manager Brasil Plural, said in a recent interview with Reuters that foreign investors were unlikely to outbid local investors in existing shares traded on the Bovespa, but were joining larger share offerings in which they could get better prices.

The latest available international portfolio flows data from Brazil’s central bank show that in the first six months of the year investors pulled more than a net $2 billion from Brazilian stocks, while investing more than a net $6 billion into Brazilian fixed-income assets.

Investors told Reuters the foreign exodus from stocks could be mostly attributed to increasing worries about the global economy, the U.S.-China trade war and a financial crisis in neighboring Argentina.

Yet, despite the overseas outflow from equities, the benchmark Bovespa index is up 13% this year, as the lowest domestic interest rates on record encourage local and institutional investors to diversify out of bonds.

$1 = 4.0350 reais
Reporting by Paula Arend Laier; Writing by Gabriela Mello;
Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Rosalba O’Brien

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
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12 of the most powerful fully electric cars money can buy – Business Insider

Though it gets a lot of attention, Tesla isn’t the only company creating electric cars.

Some traditional carmakers like Aston Martin and Porsche are exploring the rapidly-growing electric car field with super powerful new models which add their own flair for luxury and speed to the market.

Meanwhile, other much smaller companies are exploring the high-end electric sector, such as the relatively unknown Aspark — which hasn’t even released a production vehicle yet.

Horsepower is measured a little differently for electric cars, as an electric motors’ full torque is deployed as soon as the driver steps on the accelerator. That means an electric car can feel more powerful than an internal-combustion-engined (ICE) car with the same horsepower rating at the low end, but start to lose some of its gusto at sustained high speeds unlike a gas-powered car.

With that crucial difference in mind, here are 11 of the most powerful electric cars money can buy, including some that are setting world records.

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U.S. Justice Department teams up with states on probe of Big Tech firms

ASPEN, Colo./WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department is working with a group of more than a dozen state attorneys general as it moves forward with a broad investigation into major technology companies, the department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, said on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO: Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General of the Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice, speaks at the 2019 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., April 29, 2019. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Delrahim said at a tech conference in Colorado the government is looking at previously approved acquisitions as part of a broad antitrust review announced in July of major tech firms with significant market power.

“Those are some of the questions that are being raised … whether those were nascent competitors that may or may not have been wise to approve,” Delrahim said. “Whether the intention of the incumbent was to purchase some of those competitors, I don’t know. I’m not privy to the facts of each of those investigations.”

On July 23, the Justice Department said it was opening a broad investigation into whether major digital technology firms engaged in anticompetitive practices, including concerns raised about “search, social media, and some retail services online.”

That was an apparent reference to Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google, Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) and Facebook Inc (FB.O), and potentially Apple Inc (AAPL.O).

More than a dozen states are expected to announce in the coming weeks they are launching a formal probe, a person briefed on the matter told Reuters.

“I think it’s safe to say more than a dozen or so state attorneys general that have expressed an interest in the subject matter,” Delrahim said.

U.S. Representative David Cicilline, a Democrat who chairs a House panel that oversees antitrust issues, said on Tuesday, “Big tech platforms aren’t going to regulate themselves. I’m pleased that several state attorneys general are now conducting their own investigation into the dominance of these firms.”

In July, eight state attorneys general met with U.S. Attorney General William Barr to discuss the effect of big tech companies on competition, and various antitrust actions.

The New York Attorney General’s office said on Monday it is continuing to “engage in bipartisan conversations about the unchecked power of large tech companies.” North Carolina’s attorney general, Josh Stein, is also “participating in bipartisan conversations about this issue,” his office said.

The department is looking not only at price effects, but also innovation and quality, and the next steps in its broad antitrust review would be seeking documents and other information and could include some compulsory requests, Delrahim said.

After the July announcement the companies under investigation “immediately reached out to work with us in a cooperative manner to provide information that we need as far as the investigation,” Delrahim added.

The Federal Trade Commission in June told Facebook it had opened an antitrust investigation. Last month, the FTC resolved a separate privacy probe into Facebook’s practices after the company agreed to pay a $5 billion penalty.

Reporting by Katie Paul in Colorado, David Shepardson in Washington and Supantha Mukherjee in Bengaluru; Editing by Patrick Graham and Matthew Lewis

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UPDATE 2-U.S. Justice Department teams up with states on probe of Big Tech firms

ASPEN, Colo./WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department is working with a group of more than a dozen state attorneys general as it moves forward with a broad investigation into major technology companies, the department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, said on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO: Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General of the Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice, speaks at the 2019 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., April 29, 2019. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Delrahim said at a tech conference in Colorado the government is looking at previously approved acquisitions as part of a broad antitrust review announced in July of major tech firms with significant market power.

“Those are some of the questions that are being raised … whether those were nascent competitors that may or may not have been wise to approve,” Delrahim said. “Whether the intention of the incumbent was to purchase some of those competitors, I don’t know. I’m not privy to the facts of each of those investigations.”

On July 23, the Justice Department said it was opening a broad investigation into whether major digital technology firms engaged in anticompetitive practices, including concerns raised about “search, social media, and some retail services online.”

That was an apparent reference to Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google, Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) and Facebook Inc (FB.O), and potentially Apple Inc (AAPL.O).

More than a dozen states are expected to announce in the coming weeks they are launching a formal probe, a person briefed on the matter told Reuters.

“I think it’s safe to say more than a dozen or so state attorneys general that have expressed an interest in the subject matter,” Delrahim said.

U.S. Representative David Cicilline, a Democrat who chairs a House panel that oversees antitrust issues, said on Tuesday, “Big tech platforms aren’t going to regulate themselves. I’m pleased that several state attorneys general are now conducting their own investigation into the dominance of these firms.”

In July, eight state attorneys general met with U.S. Attorney General William Barr to discuss the effect of big tech companies on competition, and various antitrust actions.

The New York Attorney General’s office said on Monday it is continuing to “engage in bipartisan conversations about the unchecked power of large tech companies.” North Carolina’s attorney general, Josh Stein, is also “participating in bipartisan conversations about this issue,” his office said.

The department is looking not only at price effects, but also innovation and quality, and the next steps in its broad antitrust review would be seeking documents and other information and could include some compulsory requests, Delrahim said.

After the July announcement the companies under investigation “immediately reached out to work with us in a cooperative manner to provide information that we need as far as the investigation,” Delrahim added.

The Federal Trade Commission in June told Facebook it had opened an antitrust investigation. Last month, the FTC resolved a separate privacy probe into Facebook’s practices after the company agreed to pay a $5 billion penalty.

Reporting by Katie Paul in Colorado, David Shepardson in Washington and Supantha Mukherjee in Bengaluru; Editing by Patrick Graham and Matthew Lewis

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The Twitter Emoji Mashup Bot is now available as free iMessage stickers

One of Twitter’s best accounts, the Emoji Mashup Bot — which smushes together two or three random emojis to generate a hybrid emoji every hour — has just released a free iMessage sticker pack. Although the bot, created by 18-year-old student Louan Bengmah, has created countless combinations since it was created in July, the iMessage sticker pack is limited to a select choice of 29 very good emoji.

Here’s one for when you’re crying in the club:

One to use when you’re blasting Old Town Road in the car on your way to the Area 51 raid:

One for Pennywise to use when he’s mass-texting all of Derry in It: Chapter Two, in theaters September 6th:

You get it! It’s a perfect concept, and the bot captures all the millennial angst, ennui, and complex emotional nuance of being alive in 2019. And now you can text all these feelings to your friends when words aren’t enough.

The iMessage stickers were created by developer Maxence Guegnolle, and Bengmah’s worked with various developers to approve the stickers on other platforms. Android users can find the stickers on WhatsApp, Gboard, and Telegram.

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Walmart sues Tesla over several solar panel fires caused by ‘negligence’

Malfunctioning Tesla solar panels started fires at “no fewer than” seven Walmart stores, resulting in hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage, the retail giant alleges in a new lawsuit filed in New York State Supreme Court Tuesday. The lawsuit was first reported by Bloomberg.

Walmart alleges that “years of gross negligence” and “failure to live up to industry standards by Tesla” sparked the blazes and led at least seven locations to close temporarily over the last seven years. Representatives for Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tesla has installed solar panels at more than 240 Walmart locations, but lawyers for the retailer write in the complaint that “the occurrence of multiple fires involving Tesla’s solar systems is but one unmistakable sign of negligence.” Walmart alleges in the suit that Tesla didn’t ground its systems properly, that the solar panels installed at Walmart sites were defective, and that Tesla didn’t keep proper documentation of the systems.

According to Walmart’s suit, the problems started with SolarCity before Tesla acquired the solar panel company in 2016. SolarCity had “adopted an ill-considered business model that required it to install solar panel systems haphazardly and as quickly as possible in order to turn a profit, and the contractors and subcontractors who performed the initial installation work had not been properly hired, trained, and supervised.”

Walmart claims that Tesla has failed to provide a complete set of “final ‘root cause’ analyses needed to identify the precise defects in its systems that caused all of the fires.”

“The number of defects, however, is overwhelming and plainly indicative of systemic, widespread failures by Tesla to meet the standard of care, as set forth in the governing contracts, as to the solar systems installed at Walmart’s stores,” lawyers for Walmart write.

Walmart says it “demanded” that Tesla disconnect all of its solar panels after three fires broke out in 2018 in Ohio, Maryland, and California. Tesla complied, according to the complaint, but Walmart says another fire broke out anyway at a second California store.

The news comes just a few days after Tesla relaunched the website for its residential solar program and announced a new rental option.

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Porsche shows Taycan interior in Apple Music announcement

Porsche announced on Monday that its new Taycan electric car will be the first to incorporate Apple Music streaming in its central infotainment display.

In the process it provided something perhaps more noteworthy: a first glimpse of the Taycan's dashboard, which has a digital instrument cluster reminiscent of the iconic Porsche 911's five dials, and a central, vertically mounted touchscreen.

Porsche did not reveal the size of the central touchscreen, but the image of the interior shows it integrated into the vertical surface of the dashboard, underneath the overhanging top pad of the dash to provide some shade to aid legibility on bright days.

Porsche Taycan

Porsche Taycan prototype

The style is a stark contrast to many of the latest electric cars, such as the Tesla Model 3, which perch the center screen in front of or on top of the dashboard, emphasizing its connection to a tablet computer. The higher location can help drivers look at information on the screen more quickly and minimize the time their eyes are off the road, and works well for information such as navigation and instrumentation. Tesla even puts the speedometer and other driving functions in the screen, which could be difficult to read if it were mounted lower.

Porsche sticks to an instrument cluster behind the steering wheel for those displays, though it does so in a style reminiscent of analog gauges.

Porsche Taycan prototype

Porsche Taycan acceleration test

Recent gas models from Porsche, including the 911, have also featured digital gauges, including a small LCD screen for a digital display at the bottom of the speedometer. The instrument cluster in the Taycan looks almost entirely digital and seems a bit of an affectation compared with digital instrument displays in other modern electric cars.

Apple Music

The integrated Apple Music streaming service offers up to 50 million songs, and Porsche will offer three years of free internet streaming in the Taycan to support it, though Apple Music will only be free for six months.

The service will include Apple's Siri voice assistant, which can control playback, and drivers can save a song to Apple Music that they hear it on terrestrial radio.

Porsche will also offer curated Porsche playlists within Apple Music

"Listening to music while driving can be an electrifying feeling," said Oliver Schusser, the vice president of Apple Music and International Content. “With the introduction of the Taycan, customers now can choose Apple Music built-in seamlessly to find the perfect soundtrack for every drive.”

The system will also support Apple CarPlay, and Porsche will offer an optional high-end Burmester surround-sound system in the Taycan to improve music fidelity and power.

The Taycan is set to debut Sept. 4.

Original Article

Rivian roofs, Porsche Taycan dash, CHAdeMO vs. CCS: Today’s Car News

Porsche teased the first look inside its Taycan electric car. Rivian announced that its upcoming R1S SUV will offer four different roof options. We take a tally of DC fast charging. And our latest Twitter poll asks readers if they think crash-test ratings are more or less important for EVs. All this and more on Green Car Reports.

Rivian revealed in a Tweet that its new R1S electric SUV will be available with four different roofs: steel, removable composite panels, and two glass options.

Along with an announcement that it will be the first car to offer integrated Apple Music, Porsche gave the first glimpse inside its new Taycan electric car.

Even as automakers in the U.S., Europe, and Korea agreed to use CCS chargers, CHAdeMO fast-chargers still outnumber them in terms of number of stations.

And our latest Twitter poll looks at a number of new top safety ratings for electric and fuel-cell cars, and asks whether readers see them as more or less important than those for conventional gas cars.

The co-founder of embattled Chinese electric-car startup Nio stepped down.

Finally, Ford recalled more than 100,000 2015 Ford Fusions and Lincoln MKZs, including their hybrid versions, because their seat belts can erode.

_______________________________________

Follow Green Car Reports on Facebook and Twitter

Original Article

Tesla’s Service May Not Be Perfect, But It Is Still Far Better Than The “Competition”

Cars

Published on August 17th, 2019 |
by Kyle Field

Tesla’s Service May Not Be Perfect, But It Is Still Far Better Than The “Competition”

August 17th, 2019 by Kyle Field

Tesla has long been criticized for service that lags behind the company’s exponential growth in sales, but the reality of the situation is significantly more optimistic. In reality, Tesla continues to innovate, even in a challenging area like service, delivering an experience that bests the competition.

Thanks to a recent update, service requests for both service centers and mobile service can now be requested through the Tesla app, saving owners a few minutes per service request. These requests come in the language millennials and the tech-literate are familiar with. It’s even easier to create than a text message, and with pre-defined requests for the most common service requests from an app that all owners already have installed and set up, it is as easy as it gets.

Once the service request has been created, a ticket is routed to either the nearest service center or the service center supporting the mobile service team covering the area where the vehicle is located.

My Tesla Model 3 had an issue with the driver’s side door not latching every time it was closed, which is clearly an issue Tesla is aware of already. When I first put the ticket in, the ability to request mobile service was not an option from the app, so I created the ticket at my local service center in the hopes that it could and would be re-routed to a mobile service team. A few minutes later, I received a text from the service center that the parts had been ordered.

Image credit: Kyle Field | CleanTechnica

A few days after creating the request in the app, I received another, less encouraging text informing me that the parts needed for my repair were not at the service center yet and that my appointment would need to be rescheduled. They automatically rescheduled it for me and the new date and time showed up in the app.

Image credit: Kyle Field | CleanTechnica

Several days after this, I received notification that the parts were again delayed, but my appointment was not rescheduled. The specific issue I was struggling with resulted in the door not actually latching closed perhaps once out of every 8 or 10 times I closed it. Annoying, but not critical.

Because the appointment was not rescheduled and it was not a critical issue, I simply let the appointment lapse. Ideally, Tesla would have automatically rescheduled the appointment, as they had done the previous time, but instead, it simply expired. The next time my door didn’t latch correctly on the first try, I remembered and put in a new ticket. This time, there was an option in the app to select mobile service, which I gladly did. As an aside, this is just one example of the many smartphone app updates and in-car software updates Tesla makes just about every two weeks. Not all of them are as impactful, but there always seem to be new bits of functionality added to the overall Tesla experience all the time.

A few short days after I put my mobile service ticket in, it was time for my mobile service appointment. I had been given a window of time from 8:30–10:30am for my mobile service appointment to begin. At 9:00am, the mobile service tech texted me to share that he would be arriving around 10:00am. That’s a nice courtesy compared to many mobile service providers that give both a longer window for service and no notification.

Around 10:00am, the technician arrived and started working on the car. The service itself was performed very quickly, as the technician changed out an electromechanical actuator in the door. The task required the interior door panel to be removed and some parts to be changed out. On my end, it required little more than opening the garage door and a few questions about what the technician would be doing. On the other end of the appointment, the technician was extremely professional and informed me that the work had been done under warranty and nothing was due.

Image credit: Kyle Field | CleanTechnica

The day after the repair was made, the Tesla service center where I had originally made a service appointment called me to inform me that the parts for my repair had arrived. In turn, I shared that the repair had been made by the mobile service team the day prior and that the original service request had timed out.

It was not a major miss, but highlights the minor chaos that rules many of Tesla’s processes across service, sales, delivery, and beyond. The pace of change at Tesla is unprecedented in any other modern industry. In an automotive company, it is not only unprecedented, it is outright astounding that Tesla is able to keep its head above water as it chases the next service backend innovation, like an app change that adds a completely new service channel, a new parts ordering system that routes parts directly to service centers instead of to a giant warehouse in Fremont, or an entirely new vehicle arriving in just a handful of months.

Image credit: Kyle Field | CleanTechnica

How does Tesla’s service compare to legacy automakers? It’s far better to the point of making them a joke. It is extremely easy for me to request service from the app I already use regularly, it takes far less time than a phone call, and it requires significantly less effort. The text updates represent another incremental improvement over every other automotive dealership I’ve worked with on previous repairs.

From the first service request to the door being fixed took just under one month. In the meantime, it was handled through two different service channels (service center and mobile service) and one major improvement was made to the overall service process (being able to request mobile service from the app).

The total process required maybe 30 minutes of my time. That alone is a huge differentiator. Coincidentally, my wife had her Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric drive in the shop on exactly the same day for a single service item that was prescheduled, and she still has the loaner C-Class gasmobile that was given to her, with another 10 days to wait until the parts they realized were needed will be in.

I’ll take the Tesla experience over the Mercedes-Benz experience, thank you very much. That is not just me as a journalist or Tesla enthusiast speaking — that’s me as a customer and a very normal guy who likes to have his car at home or on the road rather than in the shop. May your mileage vary and may it be all electric.

About the Author

Kyle Field I'm a tech geek passionately in search of actionable ways to reduce the negative impact my life has on the planet, save money and reduce stress. Live intentionally, make conscious decisions, love more, act responsibly, play. The more you know, the less you need. TSLA investor.

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This site uses cookies: Find out more.Okay, thanksOriginal Article

A Tesla Voyage Without Carbon — #CleanTechnica Exclusive

Cars

Published on August 17th, 2019 |
by Carolyn Fortuna

A Tesla Voyage Without Carbon — #CleanTechnica Exclusive

August 17th, 2019 by Carolyn Fortuna

He started nearly a year ago, pushing the Tesla Supercharger network to its limits and attempting to answer questions about what it means to experience all-electric transportation. Arthur Driessen embarked on a Tesla voyage without carbon as a way to determine if, indeed, the advent of electronic vehicles is upon us and what it would take to explore the US through Supercharging.

To do so, he needed to figure out the practicality of trying to explore the US in a Tesla without worrying about running out of fuel. Equipped with his Tesla Model 3, a Sony PCM-d100, an iPhone, and a MacBook, Arthur has tried his best to go as far away from a Supercharger as possible. Using only samples from his journeys and sound design through modern audio technology, he’s in the process of creating a fully functional library of instruments to document his travels.

Here’s his story.

“April in Alabama and a Tesla,” by Arthur Driessen.

Tell us a bit about your Tesla.

“I’m driving a Tesla Model 3 Long Range Single Motor. A big reason I bought a Tesla was because of the brand recognition. When I say brand recognition, I am referring to their recognition as leaders in the EV field opposed to your average person knowing what a Tesla is. I had started seeing the Model S around LA in 2012 and was immediately interested in them. They were cool, sleek, and sexy, but what really got me excited about them was the driver assist technology.

“When the X was in development, my boss asked me to go research it for him, which really started my love for the brand. I fell in love with the entire philosophy around them of pushing technology into the automotive industry for the betterment of our society opposed to profit. I bought some stock as I couldn’t afford the car and started looking forward to the day the ‘third phase’ of Elon’s master plan would happen.”

“Well-Preserved Ancient Wupatki National Monument in Arizona,” by Arthur Driessen.

When and why did you purchase your Tesla Model 3, and why did you choose it over other EVs?

“To be honest, I didn’t really think about getting another brand of EV. They seemed more like compliance cars than actual cars a brand would be proud of. I lived in an apartment so I wanted as much range as possible and, most importantly, they didn’t have Autopilot, which was my number one reason of wanting a Tesla.

“That brings us to the announcement of the Model 3. I had been looking at new cars, knowing that my current 2010 Honda Civic had 160,000 miles on it. After watching the announcement, I realized that its release fit up perfectly with the timeline of my car biting the dust.

“Furthermore, I could start putting payments on it right away, effectively giving me a huge head start in the year that I had to wait. I put my $1000 deposit down and awaited anxiously. 2 years to the day of placing my reservation, I received my car.”

“Tesla at the Flaming Gorge, Sweetwater County, WY,” by Arthur Dreissen

How has the Tesla Model 3 responded on the road during your Tesla voyage without carbon?

“On the road, after 86,000 miles (just passed 86 the other day!) it still drives as if I picked it up last month. I have never been happier with a purchase. I have only had to have one repair, which was something to do with a tire squeaking, and Tesla fixed it for free. I go through tires fairly quickly though due to the battery weight, needing to replace them every 20,000 miles. With the complete lack of other maintenance, I don’t mind though.

“The car itself drives beautifully in all types of weather. I was in both the Rockies and Yellowstone during snow storms and was never worried. I’ve gotten ‘stuck’ in snow or sand a couple of times, but with the ‘slip start’ option in the computer, I have gotten out each time on my own.

“The range is amazing. I almost never worry about range. The only times I’ve worried are driving through extremely remote places like down to the Rio Grande at the Mexico/Texas border or up to International Falls on the Canada/Minnesota border. They are far and few up here but around enough to where, with a little planning, all anxiety leaves. Furthermore, I’ve been able to push the car a bit on range. The most I’ve gotten was 354 miles from a full battery, and that was before the latest update that upped the range a little.”

Tesla Voyage without Carbon

“Remembering Road Trips Before — the Jack Kerouac House and a Tesla,” by Arthur Dreissen.

What were some highlights from your trip? Why did these stand out over others?

“The first things that pop into mind are places I’ve gone, like Yellowstone in Wyoming or Acadia in Maine. This country is so vast that being able to see all the corners of it has caused me to really fall in love with it. There really is everything one can imagine somewhere in this country, so whether you want to see deserts, or rain forests, or snow capped mountains, it’s all there and it’s all breathtaking.

“The second thing is being able to educate people about EVs. This is such a new technology, and there really isn’t that much information out there about it. It’s downright difficult to find someone who owns an EV to be able to ask questions, and this leads to a lot of ignorance about the tech. Sometimes, just sitting at a charging station for a day and answering questions to anyone who asks is my best day of the week.

“My favorite story about this was when I was in Florida. I was sitting at a charger, and a young woman knocked on my window. She told me that she had her father with her, and he was visiting from Africa. He was 93 years old and had taken a trip to America to visit his daughters and grandchildren. He still lived in a small tribal community, and she was wondering if it was okay if she showed him my car. I was absolutely delighted to talk to him about it and to see his amazement for how far the world had come since he was a little boy in his tribe — it was awe inspiring.

“This leads me perfectly into my third highlight, which is the growth I have been able to find in myself by getting out and exploring the country — to realize how small I am and how small my bubble is. To meet new people every day who have completely different upbringings, who have completely different communities and ways of life, to be able to connect with all of them over this technology, and to be able to be share the excitement of where this technology will bring us.

“It has been enlightening and humbling.”

“Awed by Rocky Mountain National Park,” by Arthur Dreissen.

Why is driving a Tesla important to you?

“Driving a Tesla is pretty important to me — important enough to revolve my life around it, which is pretty important, I guess.

“They are the only company that I know of that is putting everything on the line to push a better future for humanity. Every part of the company revolves around that goal, from utilizing sustainable energy, to energy storage, to Autopilot.

“That last part I think is extremely important and an overlooked aspect of the positive affects of the company’s technology. The ability to let your car be on edge, and for you to be a supervisor, eliminates more stress than I can convey. Being a part of this disruption is just downright cool, too. I mean, who doesn’t want to be a part of changing the world?”

“Great Smokey Mountain National Park,” by Arthur Dreissen.

What words of advice might you offer to others about Tesla and the Model 3?

“There are so many words of advice I could have for people who would want to go on a huge trip like this in an electric vehicle.

“The first would be that, with a little planning, there should be no worry. The speed of the charging is the main thing holding most EV road trips back right now, not the amount of chargers. Of course, I would never complain about more chargers.

“The second piece of advice would be slow down. I’ve realized that the amount of energy efficiency lost between 60 mph and 80 mph is extreme. The car’s computer plans its routes based on the speed limit, so speeding will cut into that drastically. On top of that, everything uses the battery, so if you are on low battery, blasting the heat, and speeding by 20 mph, you’ll end up on the side of the road pretty quickly.

“A great solution I’ve come up with is to always set my battery display to % opposed to miles. The car can’t really predict how much heat you will be using, so 20 miles ’til empty can be abstract, but 10% is always 10%.”

“Watching Washington, DC in a Tesla,” by Arthur Dreissen.

Final Thoughts

Arthur Dreissen came up with the idea to take a Tesla voyage without carbon last summer when he piloted two separate road trips. Since then, he quit his job and decided to “go for it full time.”

His voyage has brought him across the US and back. He’s traveled from the Rio Grande to the northernmost reaches of Minnesota. He’s meandered from Illinois to Memphis, up into Kentucky, and through Virginia into Maryland, stopping by DC along the way and for some crab at Chesapeake Bay. His route has taken him into New York and Niagra Falls, through Massachusetts to Cape Ann, and up the New England coast into Maine, where he is right now. From there, he’s headed into New Hampshire and Vermont, then down to Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Throughout it all, Arthur has written a blog that is sorted alphabetically so it will be easily searchable by users “looking for cool places to go around chargers.” Each state drops down to specific towns, and each one listed has a Tesla Supercharger in it, with most having J1772s as well for non-Tesla drivers. Specific posts are linked to and categorized by those charging locations. That way, even when he has stopped writing, individuals who are on similar road trips can know which chargers they will have to stop at and can easily find interesting things to do in the area.

His end goal is to have a living database, “kind of like a combination of supercharge.info and www.atlasobscura.com.”

He’s spent a lot of time on the road listening to biographies of past presidents, “relearning our national history in a more in depth way than public school could ever teach someone.” His Tesla voyage without carbon has allowed him the opportunity to meet people and experience the US in a way that’s been invigorating, illuminating, and transformative.

Thanks, Arthur, for sharing your experience with our readers at CleanTechnica. Happy travels!

About the Author

Carolyn Fortuna Carolyn Fortuna, Ph.D. is a writer, researcher, and educator with a lifelong dedication to ecojustice. She's won awards from the Anti-Defamation League, The International Literacy Association, and The Leavy Foundation. She’s molds scholarship into digital media literacy and learning to spread the word about sustainability issues. Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook and Google+

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