12 of the most powerful fully electric cars money can buy – Business Insider

Though it gets a lot of attention, Tesla isn’t the only company creating electric cars.

Some traditional carmakers like Aston Martin and Porsche are exploring the rapidly-growing electric car field with super powerful new models which add their own flair for luxury and speed to the market.

Meanwhile, other much smaller companies are exploring the high-end electric sector, such as the relatively unknown Aspark — which hasn’t even released a production vehicle yet.

Horsepower is measured a little differently for electric cars, as an electric motors’ full torque is deployed as soon as the driver steps on the accelerator. That means an electric car can feel more powerful than an internal-combustion-engined (ICE) car with the same horsepower rating at the low end, but start to lose some of its gusto at sustained high speeds unlike a gas-powered car.

With that crucial difference in mind, here are 11 of the most powerful electric cars money can buy, including some that are setting world records.

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After 50 Years, This Would-Be ‘Ferrari Killer’ Is Back: Say Hello to the New ATS GT – Robb Report

True connoisseurs of automobiles take years or even decades to acquire their level of discernment, appreciate proper historical content and context, and use these factors as guides for what to purchase. Then they often keep their cars for a good portion of their lives. Their knowledge of a particular marque’s story, its place in the big picture of automotive history, the pecking order of greatness in a manufacturer’s or coachbuilder’s models, and what really makes for exquisite design or engineering goes far beyond performance stats. It’s nuanced and complex, like a sophisticated palate, not merely an “I only drink first-growth Bordeaux” mind-set.

Which is all to say, the ATS GT is a true connoisseur’s car. Its beauty and subtlety are obviously appealing, as is the nameplate’s intriguing backstory. Automobile Turismo e Sport’s impact on the automotive history behind in 1963, when the original ATS road car disrupted the sports and gran truism scene. To put its degree of innovation into perspective, the ATS 2500 GT was the world’s first mid-engine, road-going supercar, beating the Lamborghini Miura to the punch by three years.

The 2500 GT’s story began two years before its debut, when Ferrari was dominating the competition headlines, winning both the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the endurance racing crown with a front-engine TR61, and the Formula 1 Drivers and Constructors championships with the mid-engine 156 F1. One would think those titles would have brought joyful celebration to the hallways of Maranello in late fall 1961. Instead, there was a collective gasp of shock when eight of Ferrari’s top executives and engineers abruptly exited the company en masse. (Whether they were fired, quit or were fired before they could quit is a matter of some hairsplitting.)

This type of rare occurrence is what really has lasting historic impact, deeper than which of today’s numbers cars wins the 0–60 or quarter-mile battle, or which one most recently set the quickest Nürburgring lap. In 12 to 18 months, these “stats cars” are yesterday’s news, while repercussions from events such as Ferrari’s Palace Revolt in 1961 last a decade or more.

The first ATS 2500 GT from 1963

The first ATS 2500 GT, from 1963.  Giorgio Nada Editore

ATS was one of that upheaval’s bigger outcomes. Four months after the walkout, exiled engineers Carlo Chiti and Giotto Bizzarrini, sales manager Girolamo Gardini and others rounded up three very wealthy backers (and Ferrari clients): industrialist Giorgio Billi, tin magnate Jaime Ortiz-Patiño and Scuderia Serenissima patron Count Giovanni Volpi. Together, they formed ATS on February 11, 1962. The company’s goal was to out-Ferrari Ferrari on the road and track. While the latter proved to be a pipe dream, the avant-garde 2500 GT was a true landmark machine.

Making its debut in March 1963, the supercar was the brainchild of Chiti and had a centrally mounted all-aluminum 2.5-liter V-8, 5-speed transmission, 150 mph top speed, disc brakes all around, rigid tubular chassis, independent suspension in the front and rear and so much more that it made Ferrari’s, Maserati’s and Aston’s road cars seem antiquated. The elegant coachwork was styled by Franco Scaglione and crafted by Carrozzeria Allemano, the former being as gifted and artistic as any designer. In addition to the 2500 GT, Scaglione’s résumé includes Alfa’s 33 Stradale, BAT (5, 7 and 9), two Sportivas and Sprint Speciale, plus Lamborghini’s 350 GTV and a number of others.

The idea was to promote ATS’s name through F1 and endurance racing, all while making the world’s most advanced road car. In September 1964, a 2500 GT was Road & Track’s cover story. Seasoned journalist Griff Borgeson summed up a spectacular drive and factory visit by observing, “I was haunted by the thought that what Bugatti was noted for in the past was here, brought fully up to date.” In an even more telling statement, he raved that the car’s “truly great performance” came from “brilliant design and not from brute strength.”

Emanuele Bomboi, left, and Daniele Maritan, the principals behind ATS’s revival

Emanuele Bomboi and Daniele Maritan, the principals behind ATS’s revival.  Winston Goodfellow

But that article’s realistic, glowing appraisal and the handful of 2500 GTs produced that year were insufficient to keep ATS in the game. Unfortunately, there was friction between the shareholders early on—Billi was self-made, Count Volpi an aristocrat—and that discord all but doomed the effort. Count Volpi was the wealthiest and most experienced in the automotive arena, and the first to go; Ortiz-Patiño soon followed him. While Billi was very successful and quite enthusiastic, he did not have the pocketbook or skill set to handle the whole enterprise. Exacerbating matters was the F1 team’s bad luck (a transporter crash, constant failures to cross the finish line and more) that seemed to dog the effort through the 1963 season. Those F1-team maladies soaked up cash and slowed the development and production of the 2500 GT.

By the time deliveries started in the second half of 1964, it was too little too late, and ATS was forced to shut its doors around the turn of the year. The company and the cars became the perfect “what if” fodder of… well, car connoisseurs. Today, examples of the beauties are rare and coveted. Collector Bruce Milner’s 1964 ATS 2500 GTS took best in show at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering, in 2017. Recently, it reportedly sold for $3 million to another collector.

The new ATS GT is a marvelous modern rendition of the landmark 2500 GT. Daniele Maritan and Emanuele Bomboi are the forces behind the marque’s resurrection. Maritan is an amateur racer and successful entrepreneur, while Bomboi has lengthy experience in the coachbuilding industry that includes stints at Carrozzeria Bertone and Centro Stile Fiat.

The new Automobili Turismo e Sport ATS GT

Winston Goodfellow

On a private visit to the partners at their villa headquarters in the small village of Pombia, not far from Lake Maggiore in northern Italy, I hear how they came to resurrect the storied marque. As design director at Carrozzeria Viotti, Bomboi created the Willys AW380, a marvelous mid-engine prototype that would become the new Alpine A110. The AW380 was unveiled at 2014’s Bologna Motor Show, which is where the first seeds of the ATS revival were sown.

The two men had already crossed paths, but that Bologna show was the first time they really connected. As their friendship blossomed, their mutual interest in ATS—and tantalizing speculation about what could have been—came to the fore, and the two decided to collaborate on reviving the nameplate. Both savvy in production and design, they took the basic ATS recipe of an elegant, high-performance, mid-engine, two-seat coupe and adapted it to the 21st century.

Parked in the villa’s courtyard is the result of their labors: a harmonious, fluid silhouette possessing graceful proportions and soft curves that were clearly inspired by the original Franco Scaglione design. The following day, I am the first journalist to drive it, and it’s everything a modern supercar should be: loaded with bespoke design and engineering touches, comfortable and refined at low speeds, and a rocket ship when you put your foot in it. The suspension is compliant and communicative and the steering nicely weighted. You could easily use it every day, or have the perfect weekend escape toy.

The new Automobili Turismo e Sport ATS GT

Winston Goodfellow

Bomboi and Maritan have an excellent eye for detail, and speak of “a love of art forms and elegance.” It shows on this car, as one of their goals is to “bring true Italian beauty in design back to the roads.”

And that’s what I see in the GT. This isn’t some flashing neon sign that punches you in the face for attention. Instead, this is a car with inherent, timeless beauty. You gaze at it like an artwork, and each time you do, you notice something new.

Production has begun in ATS’s new atelier on the outskirts of Turin. There, the company is committed to providing buyers with fully bespoke models. Each is to be individually colorized so no two are alike. The interior has the same level of thoughtful, customized design, engineering and craftsmanship as the exterior. McLaren 650S’s drivetrain and platform not only bring reliability and refinement to the car but also eliminate the need for costly and time-consuming homologation.

The new Automobili Turismo e Sport ATS GT

Winston Goodfellow

But ATS didn’t stop at adopting McLaren’s technology and say the job was done. Instead, the team applied their talents to the entire power train and developed two versions of the twin-turbo V-8 with substantially more horsepower than the 650 found in the already quick 650S. The standard ATS GT’s 3.8-liter V-8 produces 730 or 830 hp, while the crazy 4.1-liter Tipo 4100 V-8 makes 900, 1,012 or 1,200 hp. And, like the 3.8-liter, it comes with a proper warranty.

Despite all these details, some will undoubtedly deride this custom-made machine because of its McLaren underpinnings. Yet few think twice about spending around double the ATS’s $900,000 to $1 million price for a Porsche restored by Singer Vehicle Design that is based upon a considerably more antiquated platform. The latter is heavily modified, the naysayers will declare. So is the ATS.

Which brings us back to the role of connoisseurs on the automotive scene. The ATS GT is a car for them, something with exquisite execution, timeless lines, impressive performance and true handcraftsmanship—all designed, developed and made in a dedicated factory. What remains to be seen is whether there are enough potential clients out there who are focused on more than this week’s “flavor,” simple statistics and blatant, “yes, you will stare at me” design. Let’s hope so.

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Expensive sports cars 2019 – Legit.ng

Decades ago, it was hard to imagine that one day, cars would cost upwards of $10 million. Back then, automobiles were merely means of getting from one point to another. However, technological advancements, as well as an increase in the number of super-wealthy people, have led to the development of some pricey cars. The most expensive sports cars 2019 are a mix of street-legal and track-only sports cars that will set buyers back millions of dollars.

Expensive sports cars 2019

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Various well-known models make the most expensive sports cars 2019 list as well as some lesser-known brands. The likes of Lamborghini, Bugatti and Ferrari are familiar contestants while the likes of Zenvo and Lykan can be considered as relative newcomers.

What are the top 20 most expensive cars?

One common factor among most expensive car brands is not only the sky-high price but also the small number of production units available for purchase.

Most expensive car in the world of all time

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20. Lamborghini Centenario LP: $1.9 million

Lamborghini has always been among the most expensive cars brands in the motoring industry. The Lamborghini Centenario is an exquisite product of the company’s few-off manufacturing strategy. The Centenario was produced during Mr Ferruccio Lamborghini’s 100th anniversary. A total of 40 cars were manufactured (twenty coupes and twenty convertible models). The Centenario comes with a 770 CV aspirated V12 engine which catapults the vehicle from zero to a hundred kilometres per hour in a mind-blowing 2.8 seconds.

most expensive car brands

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With new cabin technology and a 6.5L V12 engine, the Centenario is any car aficionado’s dream. Various performance features come standard with the car. These include rear-wheel steering, wide-ranging connectivity and large brake pads. The Centenario is truly a breathtaking piece of engineering.

19. Zenvo TS1: $1.9 million

Zenvo is a Danish supercar manufacturer that you have probably not heard among names of expensive cars. The TS1 GT is a sleek sports car that was manufactured to mark the company’s tenth anniversary. It was preceded by the Zenvo ST1 which was priced at $1.2 million and only had fifteen units produced. Thanks to its 5.8-litre V8 flat-plane engine, the TS1 GT can move from 0-100 kilometres per hour in a mere 2.8 seconds. This puts its acceleration performance at par with more popular sports car models such as Lamborghinis and Ferraris.

Top 20 most expensive cars

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The TS1 makes use of LED technology on all its lights and features a fully enclosed underbody for maximum downforce. On the interior, Zenvo TS1 owners will get dual-zone climate control, wireless connectivity and a host of safety equipment. Motoring fans will agree that the TS1 looks fantastic, especially in the Fjord Blue colour. Typically, bright colours such as orange, red and in rare cases, pink, tend to look great on sports cars.

18. Koenigsegg Regera: $2 million

When it comes to the most beautiful cars ever designed, the Koenigsegg Regera frequently comes up. Koenigsegg is a foreign (Swedish) sports car manufacturer based in Angelholm. The Regera is hand-assembled as a pricier alternative to other Koenigsegg models. The company only manufactured 80 Koenigsegg Regera units making it quite rare as it is with expensive sports cars. The supercar is powered by a 5.0L dry-sump V8 engine which outputs 1500 horsepower.

most expensive car in the world 2018

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According to Koenigsegg, the Regera’s V8 engine is the most downsized homologated internal combustion engine in the world at 220hp per litre. Besides fuel combustion, the Regera is also equipped with three electric motors which combined, propel the Regera to a top speed of 400 kilometres per hour in less than twenty seconds. For added exclusivity, there is a special edition Regera that comes in what the company calls a 24-carat gold-leaf accent.

17. Lamborghini Sesto Elemento: $2.2 million

Sesto Elemento loosely translates to ‘sixth element’. The name is in reference to the atomic number of carbon due to the vast use of carbon fibre in its construction. The Lamborghini Sesto Elemento is an engineering masterpiece that boasts extremely low weight due to carbon fibre elements. The car weighs less than a thousand kilograms (curb weight).

Most expensive car in the world 2019

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The Sesto Elemento is powered by the same V10 engine in the Lamborghini Gallardo that is capable of moving the car from 0-100km/h in 2.5 seconds via the permanent all-wheel-drive configuration. The car comes standard with a six-speed semi-automatic transmission gearbox and a top speed of 336km/h. Lamborghini only manufactured 20 units of this car. It is worth noting that owners are not allowed to drive this car on the streets.

16. Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta: $2.2 million

The LaFerrari Aperta is a higher-end version of the LaFerrari. Ferrari produced only 209 units of the LaFerrari Aperta, 200 of which were sold via invitation only. The nine extra units were intended for company use. The most significant difference between the LaFerrari and the LaFerrari Aperta is that the latter gets a removable carbon-fibre top.

Most expensive car in the world of all time

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In terms of powertrains, the Aperta uses a 6262 cc V12 engine combined with an electric motor for a combined output of 960 CV. The car is equipped with the company’s active aerodynamics hybrid system for unrivalled performance and engagement. The V12 engine makes the Aperta capable of accelerating from 0-100km/h in 2.4 seconds. Top speed is limited to 349km/h. The Aperta was manufactured in 2017 as the company celebrated seventy years of operation.

15. Pagani Huayra Roadster: $2.4 million

According to Horacio Pagani, everything had to come together ‘as if the entire car was carved out of a block of Carrara marble’. The Huayra is a model by the Italian company Pagani. Huayra comes from the name of the wind god ‘Huayra-Tata’. The vehicle was named the hypercar of the year by Top Gear in 2012.

Top 20 most expensive cars

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A Mercedes Benz AMG engines power the Huayra Roadster with a displacement of 5980 cubic centimetres. The engine outputs 760hp and 1000 pound-feet of torque at 5500 revolutions per minute. The engine is mated to a seven-speed gearbox manufactured by xTrac. Only a hundred units of the Huayra roadster were manufactured, and all have since been sold.

14. Ferrari F60 America: $2.5 million

The Ferrari F60 is among the rarest Ferrari models ever made. The F60 was manufactured in 2014 to commemorate the company’s 60th anniversary in America. Only ten of these vehicles were ever manufactured. All ten were delivered to America with the first one belonging to a buyer in Florida. The F60 is powered by a 6.3L V12 engine that can rev to 8700 rpm.

top 20 most expensive cars

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According to Ferrari, the F60 can accelerate from 0-100 km/h in 3.1 seconds and achieve a top speed of just over 320km/h. The F60 also features a removable soft-cloth top that can be used for speeds below 120km/h. Unlike most sports cars which are made out of carbon fibre, the F60 has an all-aluminium construction. Despite not being the fastest or the lightest Ferrari, the F60 received great reviews mainly for its striking looks and curvy design.

13. Bugatti Chiron – $ 2.7 million

The Chiron is one of the familiar faces in the sports car industry. The Bugatti Chiron is the fastest and most powerful sports car in Bugatti’s lineup. The car is the successor of the famous Bugatti Veyron. The Chiron was the vision of former Volkswagen mogul Ferdinand Piech who always demanded the fastest production cars from Bugatti.

Who owns the most expensive car in the world

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The car is powered by a fancy 8L W16 engine which is, in essence, a combination of two V8 engines. The engine feeds 1479 horsepower to the car’s drivetrain allowing it to reach 200km/h in less than seven seconds. The car can achieve a top speed of 420km/h. The distinctive quad LED lights also double up as air intakes for routing air to the front brakes. The Chiron has a combined fuel efficiency of 22.5 miles per gallon, but then again, sports cars are not exactly manufactured for fuel-efficiency. Five hundred units of the Chiron were manufactured and sold, a figure which is relatively high as compared to most rare supercars.

12. Ferrari FXX K: $2.7 million

The Ferrari FXX K is a production sports car designed by Marco Fainello and Evan Rodriguez. Similar to other sports cars, there were only forty units of the FXX K to be ever produced. A 1036hp V12 internal combustion engine powers the vehicle. The engine has been tuned for use on racing tracks through Ferrari’s HY-KERS system.

Most expensive car in the world 2019

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The FXX K has four driving modes, namely fast charge, manual boost, qualify and long run. The car is also equipped with various formula one based technology such as an electronic differential, traction control and racing antilock systems. Car fans can collectively agree that the FXX K is among the best-looking sports cars out there. It is worth noting that the FXX K is a track day car and not a street-legal model such as its predecessor, the LaFerrari.

11. Pagani Huayra BC: $2.8 million

One of the most expensive Paganis ever designed is the Huayra BC. The vehicle has a striking design that is particularly appealing to the younger generation. The BC designation stands for Benny Caiola, the first Pagani customer as well as the founder’s friend. Horacio Pagani dedicated the Huayra BC to Caiola, stating that he did it from his heart.

Most expensive car in the world of all time

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The BC is powered by a twin-turbo V12 engine that produces 790hp and 811-pound-feet of torque. The inbuilt hydraulic transmission combines perfectly with the electric motor for high-speed manoeuvres. The doors of the Huayra BC open sideways giving the car a luxurious feel. The extensive use of carbon fibre brings down the weight of the BC significantly as compared to similar aluminium-based sports cars.

10. Ferrari Pininfarina Sergio: $3 million

The top 10 Ferrari Sergio was introduced in 2013 as a concept car in memory of Pininfarina founder’s son. The Ferrari Sergio is among the rarest sports cars ever made. Ferrari only made six Ferrari Sergio cars making them some of the most coveted car models out there. The car’s design is based on the Ferrari 458 Spider, and at $3 million, it is one of the priciest production sports cars ever.

most expensive sports cars brands

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The car is powered by a 4.5L V8 engine that outputs 562hp directed to the rear wheels. In a somewhat rare exclusivity decision, each of the six vehicles made was sold to a person chosen by the car manufacturer. In terms of design, the Pininfarina Sergio features a carbon fibre frame which gives drivers a feel of comfortable open-air driving.

READ ALSO: Top 10 cars in the world you may dream about

9. Aston Martin Valkyrie: $3.2 million

Aston Martin uses the term otherworldly to describe the Valkyrie. It is easy to see why they would choose the word. Everything about the Valkyrie looks out of this world. The Valkyrie was built under the company’s president at the time, Andy Palmer. Under the hood, the car is powered by a naturally-aspirated 6.5L V12 engine. The extensive use of carbon fibre in the car’s construction allows the vehicle to have an excellent 1:1 power to weight ratio.

most expensive car in the world 2018

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The car’s engine outputs 1000hp and sprints from 0-100km/h in less than three seconds. The car achieves a top speed of 320km/h via seven-speed sequential transmission.

8. Bugatti Veyron by Mansory Vivere: $3.4 million

The Bugatti Veyron was the most potent production sports car when it was launched in 2005. Despite being later surpassed by the Bugatti Chiron, it is still among the most sought-after models by car collectors. The manufacturer only made 270 units of the original Veyron. For those looking for more exclusivity, the German firm, Mansory, was there to fine-tune a handful of them such as the rare Linea Vivere.

expensive cars brands

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There are only two Linea Vivere models in the world. The car features a quad-turbo 8.0L W16 engine that outputs 1200hp. The first car’s owner had it done in matte white with new carbon fibre rear and front bumpers. The customizing company also added daytime running lights, custom wheels and strikingly cool side skirts.

7. Lykan Hypersport: $3.4 million

The founder of W Motors, which manufactures the Lykan Hypersport describes the car as ‘a modern machine with a touch of humanity’. The car’s headlights feature 440 24-carat diamonds with specific light blades being made with 40-carat diamond varieties. The Hypersport cast the company into the limelight when it starred in the film Fast and Furious 7. W Motors only made seven units of this vehicle.

who owns the most expensive car in the world

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The Hypersport is powered by a 3.8L twin-turbo six-cylinder engine that produces 780hp and 960 pound-feet of torque. The car can sprint from 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds and is limited to a top speed of 395km/h. In a refreshing touch of exclusivity, the car’s carbon-fibre body is entirely hand-crafted. There are 440 diamonds in the car’s headlights.

6. Aston Martin Vulcan: $3.4 million

The Aston Martin Vulcan is a track-only car produced in 2015 and launched officially at the 2015 Geneva motor sow. The Vulcan is powered by a 7.0L naturally-aspirated V12 engine mounted on an aluminium chassis. The engine outputs 800hp. The Aston Martin Vulcan was designed by the company’s creative director, Marek Reichman.

Design-wise, the Vulcan features a two-seater 2 door configuration inspired by other models such as the DB-9, Vantage and the One 77. Aston Martin only manufactured 24 units of the Vulcan making it one of the rare sports cars out there.

5. McLaren P1 LM: $3.6 million

The top 5 section begins with the P1 LM which is the street-legal version of the track-only McLaren P1 GTR. British car firm Lanzante was responsible for converting the GTR into the street-legal version. It is not the first time that the after-market firm has converted track-only McLaren vehicles into street-legal models. The converted models are then sold to customers in Japan, the US, UK and the UAE.

names of expensive cars

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The car is powered by a 3.8L twin-turbo engine and is significantly lighter than the P1 GTR on which it is based. The P1 LM engine outputs 986bhp and 1000ps. There are only five units of the McLaren P1 LM in the world.

READ ALSO: Top 10 most expensive cars in the world 2019

4. Lamborghini Veneno Roadster: $4.5 million

According to Lamborghini, driving the Veneno ‘will feel like flying on the road’. The car’s name is Spanish for venom and true to its name, the vehicle looks stunningly menacing. The Veneno was designed as a commemoration of Lamborghini’s fifty years in operation. Under the hood, there is a 6.5L V12 engine coupled to a seven-speed manual gearbox.

who owns the most expensive car in the world

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The engine produces 740hp and propels the Veneno from 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds. For exclusivity, the company manufactured only nine units of the model. The Veneno will almost always appear on most expensive car lists.

3. Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita: $4.8 million

Trevita is Swedish for ‘three whites’. The name comes from the nice carbon fibre weave pattern on the car’s bodywork. Using unique technology, Koenigsegg was able to achieve a diamond finish on the car’s carbon fibre surface. When sunshine hits the car’s surface, it seems like countless diamonds are embedded inside the car’s bodywork.

most expensive car brands

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The vehicle is powered by an aluminium 4.8L V8 engine which outputs 1018hp at 7000rpm. The car can accelerate from 0-100 km/h in 2.9 seconds, placing it among the fastest accelerating production cars today. The Trevita’s top speed is capped at 410km/h. The manufacturer only made two units of this model, making it one of the rarest sports cars ever made.

2. Mercedes-Benz Maybach Exelero: $8 million

Which car is the most expensive in the world 2018? Short answer, the Maybach Exelero. The Exelero is the perfect blend of the most luxurious coupe and the sharpest sports car. The Maybach Exelero is powered by a 5.9L twin-turbo V12 engine that outputs 700hp at 5000rpm. Despite its age, the car still looks strikingly modern even today. According to Topspeed, rapper Birdman purchased the Exelero for $8 million. The Exelero was the most expensive car in the world 2018 before the introduction of the Bugatti La Voiture Noir.

most expensive car in the world 2018

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Now that we are done with the second most expensive model, which car is the most expensive in the world?

1. Bugatti La Voiture Noir: $12.5 million (before tax)

The La Voiture Noir tops the top 20 most expensive cars list. As one can tell from this top 20 list, Bugatti makes some quite costly sports cars. However, none of those models can come close to the price point of the Bugatti La Voiture Noir. It is the most expensive car in the world 2019 with an asking price of more than $18 million (after-tax). This also makes it the most expensive car in the world of all time (new vehicle).

who owns the most expensive car in the world

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According to the company, only one of these will be made and sold. Who owns the most expensive car in the world? Well, Bugatti has not revealed the identity of the La Voiture Noir buyer, but as you can guess, it must be someone who is quite rich and perhaps a prior relationship with the brand. The car’s name loosely translates to ‘black car’.

top 20 most expensive cars

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It is undeniable that the most expensive sports cars 2019 are also strikingly beautiful. While some people are lucky to come across some of them on the streets, fewer people have the luxury of owning these sports cars. The limited production quantities, as well as the substantial asking prices, have kept most people from owning these machines. Which of the vehicles fascinated you most?

READ ALSO: Highest car in the world – Top 5

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2020 Lincoln Aviator, Putting The Sport In Quiet Luxury Utility Vehicles – Forbes

Sam Abuelsamid

A decade ago, if Cadillac and Lincoln had launched all-new and directly competing products into the market at the same time, most observers would have likely predicted the Cadillac to the clear winner. But it’s now summer 2019 and the two brands that were both founded over a century ago by Henry Leland are in a very different place as they each launch three-row premium crossovers. Just weeks after driving the Cadillac XT6, we’ve had our first crack at the Lincoln Aviator.

Setting aside the global economic meltdown and GM’s bankruptcy reorganization Cadillac was actually in a pretty decent place in 2009. It had begun the process of establishing itself as a credible competitor to the big German luxury brands. It had a distinct and bold design language, dedicated platforms and the CTS-V demonstrated the ability to take on AMG, M and RS performance. Lincoln on the other hand was on the verge of being euthanized along with Mercury despite Ford avoiding chapter 11. Lincoln lacked direction and purpose. It was a dead brand walking.

Sam Abuelsamid

But five years ago that began to change. Ford committed to a major investment in the brand. A commitment to customer service and carving out a niche based around the theme of quiet luxury took hold. The brand didn’t get its own platforms, but Lincoln managed to distinguish itself from its parent in almost every way that actually matters to customers. Today, if you sit in a recent Cadillac, you are more likely to see switches or fonts shared with a Chevrolet or Buick. Someone unfamiliar with the mechanical lineage could sit in a Ford Explorer and an Aviator and never realize the two roll off the same assembly line, let alone come from the same manufacturer.

Gallery: 2020 Lincoln Aviator Reserve

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Now that Aviators are rolling off the line at Ford’s Chicago assembly plant alongside the Explorer and heading towards dealers, Lincoln invited the media out to northern California wine country to try it out on the road. There we were surrounded by both the types of affluent customers that would buy a vehicle like the Aviator and the types of roads where you would not necessarily expect to find a Lincoln SUV.

Sam Abuelsamid

The Aviator continues the themes we’ve seen in Lincolns since the debut of the Continental a few years ago. The materials and color themes are all top notch with premium leather coverings combining a choice of wood or metal accents. Sandwiched between the leading edge of the upward sweeping console and the dashboard are the now standard Lincoln piano key shift switches. These are reasonably functional and given that you won’t generally be using them while in motion, the lack of differentiation by feel isn’t really a problem.

Three trims are available, the standard, Reserve and Black Label with the latter including pretty much everything along with a slate of special concierge services. The standard model is pretty well equipped but the options list is kept short, mostly limited to color, heated front seats and steering wheel and the choice of rear or all wheel drive. Features like CoPilot 360 driver assists with lane keeping, blindspot monitoring, forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking and auto high beams are all standard. The Reserve models we drove upgrade the tri-zone climate control to quad-zone, add the hands-free liftgate, power steering column adjustment and the Revel audio system. Reserve models also have a much more extensive list of available upgrades like the air spring suspension, CoPliot 360 plus and much more.

Sam Abuelsamid

The standard powertrain in the Aviator is the same familiar 3.0-liter twin turbocharged V6 and ten-speed automatic transmission found in the Explorer ST with 400-hp and 415 lb-ft of torque. As has been the case since the debut of the Continental a few years back, Lincoln no longer used the EcoBoost branding on its turbocharged engines, leaving that to Ford. At 4,892 pounds, the AWD Aviator is about 190-lbs more than its Ford sibling, mainly due to added equipment.

We drove Reserve models that were very well equipped including the top end 30-way power adjustable front seats with both heating and ventilation. It may take some fiddling around to get the seats perfectly adjusted to your body, but once you do, you can save the settings to individual profiles tied to your key fob or phone. I personally find these seats very comfortable although I know one of my Wheel Bearings podcast co-hosts doesn’t like them, but he’s just cranky. For long road trips, these seats also have massaging capabilities with one of five patterns that move actuators in the seat cushion and back.

Sam Abuelsamid

When looking strictly by the published dimensions for the Aviator and XT6, it would appear that neither has a notable advantage in interior space aside from the much smaller cargo capacity of the Cadillac. However, there is one element of the Cadillac that I did find superior, the third row comfort. The Aviator’s downward sloping roofline requires the last two seats to be mounted a bit lower to the floor to maintain headroom. The Cadillac’s flatter, more squared off roof, allows a slightly higher position for the third row. The result is that while leg and headroom are comparable, the Lincoln forces a more knees up position while you sit more upright in the Caddie. If third-row comfort for adults is a priority, the Cadillac is your choice, for everything else, the Lincoln wins.

Phone as a key

Drivers have multiple options for getting in and out of the Aviator and other upcoming Lincolns including the Corsair. As always, there is the conventional key fob that lock and unlocks the doors and allows starting of the engine. There is also the door pillar keypad system that Ford and Lincoln vehicles have offered since the first generation Taurus in the 1980s. New for Aviator is phone as a key. Like the Tesla model 3, you can pair your smartphone to the vehicle using Bluetooth LE. Once paired, as you approach the car, it will automatically unlock, just as the key fob does without ever taking out the phone. Similarly you can start and drive the Aviator.

Sam Abuelsamid

Unlike other telematics based systems that send a signal through the cloud from phone to vehicle, there is no latency. Lincoln has installed 11 antennas around the vehicle to provide reliable connectivity and the ability to unlock just the door adjacent to where you are standing. This way you can open the tailgate without unlocking other doors or vice versa.

One of the potential challenges of such a system is dealing with valets as customers of a premium vehicle like this are more likely to do. If you haven’t brought a key fob with you, you don’t want to hand a valet your phone. This is where the keypad comes into play. On the in-vehicle touchscreen, you can enable valet mode, which will provide an eight-digit code that the valet writes on the ticket instead of taking the key. The first five digits are used to unlock the vehicle with the keypad and the full code is used to start the car on the touchscreen. The next time you unlock the vehicle with the phone or fob, the code is canceled and can’t be used again.

Sam Abuelsamid

Unlike most media drives, we didn’t get keys when we set out, instead we were just handed an iphone that had already been linked to the Aviator we were driving. Once inside, we just slid the phone into the wireless charger in one of the center console bins that also has both type A and C USB ports. If you are out and about and your phone runs out of juice, you always have the option of using the keypad to get in and then once the phone is on the charger you can start the engine.

Suspension dynamics

While Lincoln doesn’t get dedicated platforms, the new rear-drive unibody platform that the Explorer and Aviator share does have suspension flexibility built in. Both use the same type of integral link rear architecture used on the Mustang, but the Explorer has Macpherson struts at the front. The Aviator instead gets a dual control arm layout that allows for increased suspension travel and reduced friction. When combined with the air suspension and dynamic dampers, this setup makes for an excellent combination of smooth ride and precise handling.

Sam Abuelsamid

We spent the day driving through a nearly 200 mile loop in the region north of Yountville that took us along some highway stretches, but was surprisingly dominated by twisting mountain roads. It was really more the type of route you would expect for a Mustang drive than a three-row luxury crossover. But unlike the old days when a six or seven passenger SUV would be falling all over itself in this kind of environment, modern utilities like the Aviator are up to the task in a way that would have required a sports car in decades past.

At two and a half tons and nearly 17 feet long, the Aviator is hardly svelte. Nevertheless, the ample low end torque (don’t even get me started on the plug-in hybrid) moves this machine with authority. Sage canyon and other areas of our drive route are predominantly twisting two-lane roads climbing and descending through the mountains and not everyone is capable or comfortable going the same speed.

Sam Abuelsamid

Periodically on uphill stretches where there is room, an additional passing lane will open up. At one point we were in a train of several vehicles when we came upon a passing zone. As soon as the older Nissan Sentra in front of us moved over, a squeeze of the throttle had us hurtling past going uphill. Once clear, the brakes were able to haul that mass down heading into the next corner.

The extra power and the rear-drive based architecture of the Aviator also give it a significant advantage in towing capability over the Cadillac. The front/all-wheel-drive XT6 is limited to 4,000 pounds of towing while the Aviator can haul up to 6,700 pounds with the 400-hp gas V6.

The roads in that part of California aren’t always the smoothest and the terrain makes regular repaving a challenge. Nonetheless, the Aviator kept things on an even keel even when cornering at surprisingly brisk speeds. The air springs and dynamic dampers soaked up the pavement irregularities without ever feeling floaty. The meaty 275/40R22 tires were kept working even while chasing down much lighter vehicles.

Sam Abuelsamid

The steering was relatively precise and guided the Aviator exactly where pointed, but it didn’t provide any significant feedback to my fingertips. While this probably won’t bother most Lincoln customers, given the performance capability of this machine, some extra feedback would be appreciated by those of a more enthusiastic bent.

The Aviator also features a system that utilizes the front camera to look for speed bumps and other obstacles and make proactive adjustments to the dampers and springs for a smoother ride. We didn’t encounter any of these on our drive, but when I get an Aviator at home, I’ll definitely be testing it on the neighborhood speed bumps.

Sam Abuelsamid

Audio system

As has been the case with all Lincolns of late, the cabin is an exceptionally serene place to spend time even when hustling through the mountains. Some engine sound is allowed to pass through under hard acceleration, but it’s more subdued than the Explorer ST. Cruising on the highway or around town, this is a great place to decompress after a long day at the office.

That also makes it a great place to appreciate the latest Revel premium audio system. It features 28 speakers spread throughout the cabin including 4 in the ceiling. It’s all driven by Revel’s Ultima 3D audio processing system. In addition to the usual stereo sound field, you can also select in the audience or on-stage modes. The latter surrounds you in music that sounds like you are in the middle of the band or orchestra. The overhead drivers are used replicate the sort of reverb you would hear in a concert venue. An on-screen slider allows you to choose the amount of the effect you prefer. Overall, the system sounded great to my ears, although they admittedly don’t have the audio acuity they did in my younger days.

Sam Abuelsamid

Overall, after a day of driving, the 2020 Aviator comes across in most respects, as the best vehicle Lincoln has ever produced. Starting at $52,840 delivered, it’s comparably priced to the Cadillac and Audi Q7. With usable seating for up to seven and 18.3 cubic feet behind the third row, it’s very practical for those with lots of friends or family. As tested our AWD Reserve came to just shy of $75,000 which is a bit more than the premium luxury XT6 tested a few weeks back, but frankly, you get more for that price and a better, more enjoyable vehicle overall that is also a viable challenger to the brands that Cadillac has been trying to tackle for all these years.

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EDAG presents modular fuel-cell robotic vehicle CityBot – www.electrive.com

edag-citybot-concept-car-2019-01

Development service provider EDAG will be presenting a study of a swarm intelligent and multifunctional robotic vehicle with fuel cell drive for the IAA. The EDAG CityBot is to be operational around the clock and can be retrofitted as required using add-on modules.

The CityBot can be used as a passenger cell, a cargo carrier or a car for city cleaning. Due to the wide range of applications, the company confidently speaks of a “game-changer for the city of the future”.

EDAG is not reinventing the wheel with this futuristic-looking electric vehicle. Last year, for example, Daimler presented a similar modular mobility concept in the form of the Mercedes Vision Urbanetic. Depending on the body structure, the vehicle can transport up to twelve passengers or ten EPAL pallets – or, with a fully automated shelving system, become a mobile packing station. In addition, the Swiss think tank Rinspeed has founded a start-up called Snap Motion to further develop its electric concept vehicle Snap with ZF drive and prepare it for small series production. In January this year, we reported on a number of shuttle module platforms presented at the LA Motor Show.

The big difference between the EDAG concept and the two other autonomous multifunction transporters: While Daimler and Rinspeed rely on a battery-electric drive, the development service provider wants to use fuel cells. However, EDAG does not go into details about the drive in the communication, where the company has put the vehicle’s modularity as the main focus.

In conjunction with the platform technology for the Internet of Things and, for example, the digital micro-payment solutions of EDAG partner IOTA, CityBot will not only launch new, autonomous transport and work vehicles, but also possible new business models. “The city of the future must be clean, safe, worth living in, friendly, quiet and smart,” says Cosimo De Carlo, CEO of the EDAG Group. “For the CityBot, we have combined our development competencies from the Vehicle Engineering, Electrics/Electronics and Production Solutions divisions”. Thus the CityBot is “much more than a design study”.

At the IAA, the CityBot with the lounge-like module for passenger transport will be exhibited. Other possible modules, for example for city cleaning or green maintenance in parks, have been compiled in the picture gallery.

edag-engineering.de

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The Offline Executor: Virtual Testing and the Aurora Driver

Aurora Team

Our approach to simulation reflects our design philosophy — we invest time to create tools expressly for self-driving cars, increasing operational safety down the road.

This video illustrates how we turn interesting driving situations into simulations. Part one shows actual video of a complex situation that a test vehicle encountered on the road. In part two, we recreate this scene in simulation, but add additional interesting and complex behaviors. For example, in part three, we add a jaywalking pedestrian to the scene.

There’s a lot of talk in our industry about how many miles companies have driven on the road. While there is value in real-world miles, we believe the safest and most efficient way to deliver self-driving technology is by incorporating strong virtual testing capabilities into our development.

At Aurora, we invest time in building smart tools and processes that enable us to quickly accelerate development, all while keeping safety at the forefront. Our simulation work is no exception. Unlike many in the industry, we’ve taken the time to develop our own solution to analyze system performance through simulated autonomous driving scenarios, rather than rely on game engines or other pre-built software. We call this solution the offline executor.

The Value of Virtual Testing

This is an example of a simulation with many permutations of a crowd of pedestrians crossing the street.

Virtual testing provides repeatable measures of performance, speeds development, and lowers the risk inherent to real-world driving activities. Simulation is one example of our virtual testing.

For example, if we’re working on the way our software handles pedestrian crosswalks, we can pull from our database of interactions for each occasion where our Driver encountered a pedestrian at a crosswalk. Then, in simulation, we can replay those interactions and evaluate how the new code would handle not only this situation, but myriad permutations of it. We can change the parameters of the encounter: Are there two adult pedestrians? An adult and a child? Is it a group of pedestrians? This allows us to test the Driver against a diverse set of cases without needing to drive this scenario repeatedly in the real world, hoping we encounter all of the interesting variations we care about.

The vast majority of our simulation experiments are short, and focus on specific interactions, allowing us to efficiently cover a huge number of effective testing miles.

The Concept of Determinism

Adapting game engines or other applications to create simulated environments for self-driving vehicle software to navigate is effective in the short term — it gets testing operations up quickly. But this approach has an important drawback, which involves the concept of determinism.

In simulation, a test that’s deterministic is one that, given the same environmental inputs, provides the same result. No randomness is involved. Game engines can be remarkable pieces of software and we’ve been able to make use of their technology in the design and preparation of individual elements for our simulations. But they’re not built specifically for self-driving car testing. They often don’t run in lock-step with the autonomy software leading to results that are not deterministic. Given the same sensor inputs, simulations based on game engines will not necessarily provide the same test result.

That’s tricky for simulation testing because it introduces a level of uncertainty. Simulation testing aims to verify the robustness of new software code. Did the test fail because of the new code? Or did it have something to do with the non-determinism of the simulation environment? When it’s based on game engines, it’s difficult to be certain. With our systems, the simulation and autonomy software move in lock step — removing the uncertainty.

Aurora’s Offline Executor

We’ve engineered a tool built specifically for the validation of self-driving car software — the offline executor — and it’s crucial to our simulation efforts. It uses the same programming framework as the Aurora Driver software stack, and the same libraries. In fact, because it is purpose-built to work with our system, the offline executor allows us to have deterministic offline testing for any module, for any team, across the entire organization. That’s a huge benefit. Otherwise, integrating game engines to work with self-driving software can sometimes feel like putting a square peg into a round hole.

With our offline executor, we don’t have to spend a huge amount of effort integrating the simulation environment with the rest of our system. Instead, we have a system designed from the ground up that enables lock-step execution of self-driving software and the simulation it interacts with. We can then test the same software that runs on our vehicles at massive, cloud-scale including detailed simulation of latencies and compute delays that happen on real-world hardware.

When we build a new capability, the first step is to build the simulations which feature the interaction we’re developing. Next, we write the code, and then we run the code through the simulations using the offline executor.

Using the offline executor streamlines our development process by employing software modules in a manner similar to the overall self-driving stack. For example, when testing an element of the motion-planning module, the offline executor’s simulation module feeds the planner the set of inputs it otherwise would get from the perception module. These are synthesized inputs, but the motion-planning module can’t tell the difference. That means the system reacts in the same way to a simulated environment as it would in the real world — which is crucial to making reliable autonomy software.

Here’s an example: The simulation module feeds the motion-planning module the knowledge that a car is passing in the right lane, and a pedestrian is traversing a crosswalk up ahead.

Based on these inputs, the motion-planning module will calculate a trajectory — the vehicle’s intended course over the next few seconds. That output goes to the validation module. The validator’s job is to decide whether the trajectory is a good one. Did the motion-planning module do the right thing? The validation module evaluates the trajectory by asking a series of questions. Did the trajectory obey the law? Did the motion planning module meet its objective? Is this trajectory comfortable for vehicle occupants? If the motion-planning module’s trajectory passes all such tests, it passes the interaction.

Test-Driven Development

This is an example of a complex merging simulation. There are three options for the car — merging in front, merging between, or merging behind — depending on the speed, the space between the actors, and other factors. This simulation allows us to understand the decisions the Aurora Driver would make, so we can modify the behavior as needed before our cars actually hit the road.

Using test-driven development means we build a set of simulations to test a capability before we even write the code to implement that capability. For example, take an unprotected left turn. We create simulations and at first, all of the simulations usually fail — these are progression simulations. As we start to add code to implement the capability, we continue to test it against the simulations and more and more tests start to pass. We set a bar, and once our software passes that bar, we’re ready to hit the road.

This approach has multiple advantages. For one, there is a clear safety advantage to testing and validating our code before it’s on the road. It also empowers our engineers. They’re able to get feedback more quickly as they write the code, which enables them to move faster, without sacrificing safety. It also allows them to think outside the box; simulation acts as a safety net — allowing our engineers to be creative in their code because they’re confident it will be tested many times in simulation before it’s out in the world.

In order to enable this approach when it comes to perception modules, we need to simulate sensor data. To do this, we use the offline executor to create a simulation module that feeds the perception module the data it otherwise would get from its sensors — the point clouds from the LIDAR, the pixels of the camera, returns from radar. Using synthesized data, perception makes its conclusions about the world around it. The output of this process is a set of predictions about what the car sees — this set of returns is a parked car. This set of data is a cyclist. And so on. In the real world, these outputs would be fed to the motion-planning module. In simulation tests, we capture these outputs and feed them into the perception validation pipeline, which makes conclusions about the correctness of the perception module. This allows us the option to test the perception system separately from the motion planning system, which means we can validate the parts individually before bringing them together. The offline executor also allows simulation testing in which the perception and motion planning modules run together. All of which adds up to a flexible and safe way of validating the system with the offline executor.

Delivering a Safe and Robust Aurora Driver

Before we conclude, it’s important to ask: as we develop the Aurora Driver, where does on-road testing fit in?

Rather than a forum for new development, we treat real-world testing as a mechanism for validating and improving the fidelity of our more rapid virtual testing. Road time is also useful as a way to collect data concerning how expert human drivers navigate complex scenarios.

This strategy has allowed us to contain the size of our on-road testing fleet. With safety in mind, we limit the distance our test vehicles travel by pursuing mileage quality over quantity; that is, we seek out interesting miles rather than just pursuing large quantities of miles.

So whether it’s simulation, on-road testing, or other development, we take pride in an uncompromising and rigorous development process designed expressly for delivering a safe and robust Aurora Driver. While it can be tempting to use pre-existing solutions because they can save time in the short run, we know investing the effort now will pay huge dividends in the future.

Aurora is delivering the benefits of self-driving technology safely, quickly, and broadly. We’re looking for talented people to join our team.

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SWINGING DICKISM WRIT LARGE.

By Peter M. DeLorenzo

Detroit. Now that the smoke from the burning piles of money torched at “Monterey Car Week” has subsided, a couple of stories have emerged. And no, I’m not going to go into the massive screwup of the failed sale of the alleged “first Porsche” – the Type 64 – by RM Sotheby’s. That debacle will haunt that particular auction house and the entire auction “thing” for years to come. And besides, plenty has been written about it already, the best being Hannah Elliott’s take on the event in Bloomberg

First of all, there’s a distinct cooling going on in the collector car “hobby” as prices have decidedly taken a turn downward. (The fact that people still refer to the collector car circus as a “hobby” is a recurring joke; in fact, it’s a big frickin’ business with more egos involved than the jostling for seating at the “it” restaurant of the moment in Beverly Hills.) Rough estimates suggest that prices were down at least 25 percent, but I think that number is low, especially considering the number of cars that went unsold at the auctions last week. And it was bound to happen, too, even though the prognosticators in the “hobby” insisted that all was well, right up to the point that it wasn’t. 

Let’s face it, the “hobby” has turned into a nightmare. The notion of “important” collectible automobiles with notable “provenance” that were lusted after for the sheer thrill of being next to the one of most coveted machines ever built fell afoul of the scammers and speculators years ago. Greed became the “hobby’s” cottage industry, and values were regularly skewed to an unconscionable level as a matter of course. This trend redefined the term “stupid money” and took it to an entirely new level. My go-to barometer for all of this was the absurd run-up in prices for air-cooled Porsche 911s. Yes, prices have appeared to have finally softened – albeit only slightly – after a half-decade of out-of-control frenzy, but still, $100,000+ for an old 911 is de rigueur, and it still basically sucks.

The second big story to emerge from Monterey Car Week was the rise of the hypercar. What is a hypercar, exactly? Good question. These are fantasy machines that really have no rhyme or reason. There is no connection to any road-going reality with these machines because the idea of driving them on the street is beyond laughable. The manufacturers love to boast that these hypercars allow them to showcase their technological might and creative vision, but that is unmitigated bullshit. No, these bespoke projectiles are designed to extricate as much money as possible from fools who have too much money.

And the roster of manufacturers partaking in this ode to greed is an impressive one. There’s the all-electric Lotus Evija, which is touted as being “the most powerful series production road car in the world” with 2000PS and will be limited to 130 cars total.

(Lotus)

Then there’s the Aston Martin Valkyrie, which is already sold out, and the Valhalla, which boasts Red Bull Advanced Technologies from F1 and will be limited to 500 cars. Aston Martin is handpicking prospective buyers to hype up the desirability for its hypercar, because nothing lures big money buyers more than telling them that can’t have one but instead have to “qualify” for one. Gets ‘em every time.

(Aston Martin)

Then there’s the Bugatti Centodieci, a tribute by the manufacturer, ironically enough, to itself. The 1600HP machine based on the Chiron is supposed to pay homage to the Bugatti EB110 from the 90s. Only ten will be built, starting at 8 million EUROS plus VAT, but don’t worry, they’re already (allegedly) sold out.

(Bugatti)

And there are more coming. The Mercedes-AMG Project One hypercar, for instance, will feature Formula 1 technology for the road, which is, for all intents and purposes, basically meaningless at this point.

(Mercedes-Benz)

Where is all of this going? Nowhere good, as you might imagine. These bespoke projectiles are nothing more than Swinging Dickism writ large. They are frightfully expensive garage art pieces that will never be driven, because, after all, that was never the intent. Formula 1 technology for the street? Who’s kidding whom? What street? Are you going to actually drive your hypercar to the country club and hand it over to a valet? Are you going to spend hour after hour at track days to explore the limits of your hypercar to justify your purchase? The answer to these questions is a resounding no.

These hypercars are rolling monuments to greed on the manufacturers’ part, and irresistible to the buyers’ who should know better but are blinded by their unbridled egos. And these hypercars are all going to end up at auction over the next several years with two miles, or ten miles, or, well, you get the picture. And when you really think about it is calculatedly brilliant, because it keeps the operating scam of the “hobby” percolating along.

Contemplating all of this makes me realize how truly creative the True Believers at GM were – and are – with the new mid-engine Corvette Stingray. In terms of design, engineering and performance this outstanding machine was surgically priced from the start to deliver the most seductive combination of high performance and stunning value that this business has seen in a long, long time. Maybe ever. And it is simply untouchable in the market. 

The new Corvette is a proper tribute to one of the greatest icons of the automotive world. It is true to its authentic history, while offering enthusiasts a realistic opportunity to experience genuine supercar performance at a reasonable price – without the hype. What a concept.

And that’s the High-Octane Truth for this week.

(Chevrolet)

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Zenvo TSR-S 2019 review – autocar.co.uk

What’s it like?

Hugely fast, but also confusing. Due to some transmission problems with the finished TSR-S, our driving impressions came from two cars. First was a yellow prototype with a massive rollcage and a dashboard made from bare metal studded with rocker switches, and then the finished blue road-spec car after it had been judged fit enough for a limited number of laps. Despite sharing suspension settings and identical spec Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres, the two felt markedly different on track.

The prototype was short on finesse thanks to its huge roll cage, total absence of ventilation and, it seemed, soundproofing – its engine was so noisy it had broken Spa’s decibel limit at an event that also included an LMP2 car. The need for discretion meant only brief chances to experience the full force of the mighty V8, which is based on a GM LSX block but has a milled-from-billet crankshaft and forged pistons. Performance felt as mighty as the numbers suggest, the TSR-S capable of generating genuinely uncomfortable longitudinal G-loadings with a rate of acceleration that grows all the way to the car’s 7700rpm limiter. The carbon-ceramic brakes are similarly good – even my bravest-feeling braking points turned out to be grossly pessimistic – and the sequential ‘box shifted up and down with brutal immediacy.

The steering was less good, with limited communication, and the car suffered from surprising levels of understeer in slower corners. That engendered little of the faith required to push harder in something so fast, and there was no real sense of the tilting rear wing having an effect on cornering, either.

However, the production-spec blue car felt vastly better. A pep-talk with Vollertsen undoubtedly helped, he explained that the wing comes into its own when the car is on the edge of adhesion, turning up to 30 percent of the aerodynamic downforce into a force vector that moves effort to the less loaded inside rear wheel and counters body roll. The car also felt friendlier and easier to drive close to its limits, with much more dependable steering and a far more accurate front end.

My increased trust encouraged greater speed, and gave me enough faith to accelerate the TSR-S into mild oversteer, something that proved to be easy even in Spa’s quicker turns. Fighting the urge to back off revealed the Zenvo doesn’t break into the big slide that feels inevitable, rather settling into what could be termed a near-drift as the rear wing and stability control system work together to keep the car under control. The result is a car that feels much less scary than it probably should do, although it didn’t take long for hard cornering to heat the rear tyres to the point where grip started to tail off.

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Zenos E10R: Spotted – Pistonheads.com

So much of the Zenos plan seemed so good: there was expertise in the team, a clever idea on the drawing board and a proven set of mechanicals underneath. The E10 was a modern, innovative, original take on the lightweight British track special, and showed huge promise. The standard car was really good straight out of the box (and from £25k), the turbocharged E10 S added some very serious performance and the E10 R was a proper road rocket, putting Focus RS power into a car less than half the weight.

But it wasn’t to be. In 2017 the administrators had to be called in as the business became unsustainable and, although rescued by AC Cars just a couple of months later, there’s been precious little from the company in the two years since. (Naturally, if anything is known of the plight of Zenos, we’d be keen to hear an update.) Still, a lack of sales doesn’t mean a bad product – look at the host of positive reviews out there – and a used E10 is now looking like a more interesting alternative to the usual suspects than ever. Especially so when cars like this E10 R, the fastest and most circuit-focussed Zenos produced, is available for less than £30k.

As a reminder, the R used the 2.3-litre Ecoboost Ford engine from the Focus RS (where other models had been powered by the 2.0-litre) to deliver 350hp to the rear wheels of a 700kg car. Unsurprisingly performance was in another league compared to the earlier Zenoses; “astonishing” was the word used on PH, the power complemented by a chunky 350lb ft of torque for huge speed at any revs. That the car could handle and exploit all of the rampant performance was arguably even more remarkable.

The E10 R was launched as a Drive Edition, which is what we have here, and brought a range of desirable track extras: adjustable dampers, carbon seats and harnesses, short shift gear lever, quick release wheel and more. This car has the further advantage of both a limited-slip diff (not fitted as standard) and lighter OZ wheels, making for what must be the most desirable Zenos out there.

And yet it’s also one of the cheapest. That might be owing to the higher mileage compared to similar cars – some are still on the delivery mileage – but then 3,000 is hardly enormous. Which means it looks like a canny buy at £28,450, especially with some less powerful E10s still above £30,000.

Of course there are other cars that could be bought; Britain is the home of the stripped out track weapon, after all. However, while there are Caterhams and Lotuses at the money – see this 270 and Elise S, lovely cars both – it’s difficult to combine the E10’s power, performance and relative newness for this money among the more established marques.

It’s therefore easy to make a convincing case for the Zenos; there’s even some kind of roof to ensure you make it home. There will be concerns around buying the product of a seemingly defunct company – the panels could be tricky to replace, for example – but the mechanicals are at least off the shelf Ford items and so, in theory, simple enough to keep on top of. As something rarer, faster, just as talented and arguably more interesting than the immediate rivals at this price, it would be a shame for the Zenos E10 R not to find another owner soon. If something new is required for the 2019 track day season, it’s hard to think of much better.


SPECIFICATION – ZENOS E10 R

Engine: 2,261cc, 4-cyl turbocharged
Transmission: 6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
Power (hp): 350@6,000rpm
Torque (lb ft): 350@4,000rpm
MPG: NA
CO2: NA
Year registered: 2016
Recorded mileage: 3,000
Price new: £43,995 (Drive Edition)
Yours for: £28,450

See the orginal advert here.

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Expensive sports cars 2019 – Legit.ng

Decades ago, it was hard to imagine that one day, cars would cost upwards of $10 million. Back then, automobiles were merely means of getting from one point to another. However, technological advancements, as well as an increase in the number of super-wealthy people, have led to the development of some pricey cars. The most expensive sports cars 2019 are a mix of street-legal and track-only sports cars that will set buyers back millions of dollars.

Expensive sports cars 2019

Image: pixabay.com
Source: UGC

Various well-known models make the most expensive sports cars 2019 list as well as some lesser-known brands. The likes of Lamborghini, Bugatti and Ferrari are familiar contestants while the likes of Zenvo and Lykan can be considered as relative newcomers.

What are the top 20 most expensive cars?

One common factor among most expensive car brands is not only the sky-high price but also the small number of production units available for purchase.

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20. Lamborghini Centenario LP: $1.9 million

Lamborghini has always been among the most expensive cars brands in the motoring industry. The Lamborghini Centenario is an exquisite product of the company’s few-off manufacturing strategy. The Centenario was produced during Mr Ferruccio Lamborghini’s 100th anniversary. A total of 40 cars were manufactured (twenty coupes and twenty convertible models). The Centenario comes with a 770 CV aspirated V12 engine which catapults the vehicle from zero to a hundred kilometres per hour in a mind-blowing 2.8 seconds.

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With new cabin technology and a 6.5L V12 engine, the Centenario is any car aficionado’s dream. Various performance features come standard with the car. These include rear-wheel steering, wide-ranging connectivity and large brake pads. The Centenario is truly a breathtaking piece of engineering.

19. Zenvo TS1: $1.9 million

Zenvo is a Danish supercar manufacturer that you have probably not heard among names of expensive cars. The TS1 GT is a sleek sports car that was manufactured to mark the company’s tenth anniversary. It was preceded by the Zenvo ST1 which was priced at $1.2 million and only had fifteen units produced. Thanks to its 5.8-litre V8 flat-plane engine, the TS1 GT can move from 0-100 kilometres per hour in a mere 2.8 seconds. This puts its acceleration performance at par with more popular sports car models such as Lamborghinis and Ferraris.

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The TS1 makes use of LED technology on all its lights and features a fully enclosed underbody for maximum downforce. On the interior, Zenvo TS1 owners will get dual-zone climate control, wireless connectivity and a host of safety equipment. Motoring fans will agree that the TS1 looks fantastic, especially in the Fjord Blue colour. Typically, bright colours such as orange, red and in rare cases, pink, tend to look great on sports cars.

18. Koenigsegg Regera: $2 million

When it comes to the most beautiful cars ever designed, the Koenigsegg Regera frequently comes up. Koenigsegg is a foreign (Swedish) sports car manufacturer based in Angelholm. The Regera is hand-assembled as a pricier alternative to other Koenigsegg models. The company only manufactured 80 Koenigsegg Regera units making it quite rare as it is with expensive sports cars. The supercar is powered by a 5.0L dry-sump V8 engine which outputs 1500 horsepower.

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According to Koenigsegg, the Regera’s V8 engine is the most downsized homologated internal combustion engine in the world at 220hp per litre. Besides fuel combustion, the Regera is also equipped with three electric motors which combined, propel the Regera to a top speed of 400 kilometres per hour in less than twenty seconds. For added exclusivity, there is a special edition Regera that comes in what the company calls a 24-carat gold-leaf accent.

17. Lamborghini Sesto Elemento: $2.2 million

Sesto Elemento loosely translates to ‘sixth element’. The name is in reference to the atomic number of carbon due to the vast use of carbon fibre in its construction. The Lamborghini Sesto Elemento is an engineering masterpiece that boasts extremely low weight due to carbon fibre elements. The car weighs less than a thousand kilograms (curb weight).

Most expensive car in the world 2019

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The Sesto Elemento is powered by the same V10 engine in the Lamborghini Gallardo that is capable of moving the car from 0-100km/h in 2.5 seconds via the permanent all-wheel-drive configuration. The car comes standard with a six-speed semi-automatic transmission gearbox and a top speed of 336km/h. Lamborghini only manufactured 20 units of this car. It is worth noting that owners are not allowed to drive this car on the streets.

16. Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta: $2.2 million

The LaFerrari Aperta is a higher-end version of the LaFerrari. Ferrari produced only 209 units of the LaFerrari Aperta, 200 of which were sold via invitation only. The nine extra units were intended for company use. The most significant difference between the LaFerrari and the LaFerrari Aperta is that the latter gets a removable carbon-fibre top.

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In terms of powertrains, the Aperta uses a 6262 cc V12 engine combined with an electric motor for a combined output of 960 CV. The car is equipped with the company’s active aerodynamics hybrid system for unrivalled performance and engagement. The V12 engine makes the Aperta capable of accelerating from 0-100km/h in 2.4 seconds. Top speed is limited to 349km/h. The Aperta was manufactured in 2017 as the company celebrated seventy years of operation.

15. Pagani Huayra Roadster: $2.4 million

According to Horacio Pagani, everything had to come together ‘as if the entire car was carved out of a block of Carrara marble’. The Huayra is a model by the Italian company Pagani. Huayra comes from the name of the wind god ‘Huayra-Tata’. The vehicle was named the hypercar of the year by Top Gear in 2012.

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A Mercedes Benz AMG engines power the Huayra Roadster with a displacement of 5980 cubic centimetres. The engine outputs 760hp and 1000 pound-feet of torque at 5500 revolutions per minute. The engine is mated to a seven-speed gearbox manufactured by xTrac. Only a hundred units of the Huayra roadster were manufactured, and all have since been sold.

14. Ferrari F60 America: $2.5 million

The Ferrari F60 is among the rarest Ferrari models ever made. The F60 was manufactured in 2014 to commemorate the company’s 60th anniversary in America. Only ten of these vehicles were ever manufactured. All ten were delivered to America with the first one belonging to a buyer in Florida. The F60 is powered by a 6.3L V12 engine that can rev to 8700 rpm.

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According to Ferrari, the F60 can accelerate from 0-100 km/h in 3.1 seconds and achieve a top speed of just over 320km/h. The F60 also features a removable soft-cloth top that can be used for speeds below 120km/h. Unlike most sports cars which are made out of carbon fibre, the F60 has an all-aluminium construction. Despite not being the fastest or the lightest Ferrari, the F60 received great reviews mainly for its striking looks and curvy design.

13. Bugatti Chiron – $ 2.7 million

The Chiron is one of the familiar faces in the sports car industry. The Bugatti Chiron is the fastest and most powerful sports car in Bugatti’s lineup. The car is the successor of the famous Bugatti Veyron. The Chiron was the vision of former Volkswagen mogul Ferdinand Piech who always demanded the fastest production cars from Bugatti.

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The car is powered by a fancy 8L W16 engine which is, in essence, a combination of two V8 engines. The engine feeds 1479 horsepower to the car’s drivetrain allowing it to reach 200km/h in less than seven seconds. The car can achieve a top speed of 420km/h. The distinctive quad LED lights also double up as air intakes for routing air to the front brakes. The Chiron has a combined fuel efficiency of 22.5 miles per gallon, but then again, sports cars are not exactly manufactured for fuel-efficiency. Five hundred units of the Chiron were manufactured and sold, a figure which is relatively high as compared to most rare supercars.

12. Ferrari FXX K: $2.7 million

The Ferrari FXX K is a production sports car designed by Marco Fainello and Evan Rodriguez. Similar to other sports cars, there were only forty units of the FXX K to be ever produced. A 1036hp V12 internal combustion engine powers the vehicle. The engine has been tuned for use on racing tracks through Ferrari’s HY-KERS system.

Most expensive car in the world 2019

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The FXX K has four driving modes, namely fast charge, manual boost, qualify and long run. The car is also equipped with various formula one based technology such as an electronic differential, traction control and racing antilock systems. Car fans can collectively agree that the FXX K is among the best-looking sports cars out there. It is worth noting that the FXX K is a track day car and not a street-legal model such as its predecessor, the LaFerrari.

11. Pagani Huayra BC: $2.8 million

One of the most expensive Paganis ever designed is the Huayra BC. The vehicle has a striking design that is particularly appealing to the younger generation. The BC designation stands for Benny Caiola, the first Pagani customer as well as the founder’s friend. Horacio Pagani dedicated the Huayra BC to Caiola, stating that he did it from his heart.

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The BC is powered by a twin-turbo V12 engine that produces 790hp and 811-pound-feet of torque. The inbuilt hydraulic transmission combines perfectly with the electric motor for high-speed manoeuvres. The doors of the Huayra BC open sideways giving the car a luxurious feel. The extensive use of carbon fibre brings down the weight of the BC significantly as compared to similar aluminium-based sports cars.

10. Ferrari Pininfarina Sergio: $3 million

The top 10 Ferrari Sergio was introduced in 2013 as a concept car in memory of Pininfarina founder’s son. The Ferrari Sergio is among the rarest sports cars ever made. Ferrari only made six Ferrari Sergio cars making them some of the most coveted car models out there. The car’s design is based on the Ferrari 458 Spider, and at $3 million, it is one of the priciest production sports cars ever.

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The car is powered by a 4.5L V8 engine that outputs 562hp directed to the rear wheels. In a somewhat rare exclusivity decision, each of the six vehicles made was sold to a person chosen by the car manufacturer. In terms of design, the Pininfarina Sergio features a carbon fibre frame which gives drivers a feel of comfortable open-air driving.

READ ALSO: Top 10 cars in the world you may dream about

9. Aston Martin Valkyrie: $3.2 million

Aston Martin uses the term otherworldly to describe the Valkyrie. It is easy to see why they would choose the word. Everything about the Valkyrie looks out of this world. The Valkyrie was built under the company’s president at the time, Andy Palmer. Under the hood, the car is powered by a naturally-aspirated 6.5L V12 engine. The extensive use of carbon fibre in the car’s construction allows the vehicle to have an excellent 1:1 power to weight ratio.

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The car’s engine outputs 1000hp and sprints from 0-100km/h in less than three seconds. The car achieves a top speed of 320km/h via seven-speed sequential transmission.

8. Bugatti Veyron by Mansory Vivere: $3.4 million

The Bugatti Veyron was the most potent production sports car when it was launched in 2005. Despite being later surpassed by the Bugatti Chiron, it is still among the most sought-after models by car collectors. The manufacturer only made 270 units of the original Veyron. For those looking for more exclusivity, the German firm, Mansory, was there to fine-tune a handful of them such as the rare Linea Vivere.

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There are only two Linea Vivere models in the world. The car features a quad-turbo 8.0L W16 engine that outputs 1200hp. The first car’s owner had it done in matte white with new carbon fibre rear and front bumpers. The customizing company also added daytime running lights, custom wheels and strikingly cool side skirts.

7. Lykan Hypersport: $3.4 million

The founder of W Motors, which manufactures the Lykan Hypersport describes the car as ‘a modern machine with a touch of humanity’. The car’s headlights feature 440 24-carat diamonds with specific light blades being made with 40-carat diamond varieties. The Hypersport cast the company into the limelight when it starred in the film Fast and Furious 7. W Motors only made seven units of this vehicle.

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The Hypersport is powered by a 3.8L twin-turbo six-cylinder engine that produces 780hp and 960 pound-feet of torque. The car can sprint from 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds and is limited to a top speed of 395km/h. In a refreshing touch of exclusivity, the car’s carbon-fibre body is entirely hand-crafted. There are 440 diamonds in the car’s headlights.

6. Aston Martin Vulcan: $3.4 million

The Aston Martin Vulcan is a track-only car produced in 2015 and launched officially at the 2015 Geneva motor sow. The Vulcan is powered by a 7.0L naturally-aspirated V12 engine mounted on an aluminium chassis. The engine outputs 800hp. The Aston Martin Vulcan was designed by the company’s creative director, Marek Reichman.

Design-wise, the Vulcan features a two-seater 2 door configuration inspired by other models such as the DB-9, Vantage and the One 77. Aston Martin only manufactured 24 units of the Vulcan making it one of the rare sports cars out there.

5. McLaren P1 LM: $3.6 million

The top 5 section begins with the P1 LM which is the street-legal version of the track-only McLaren P1 GTR. British car firm Lanzante was responsible for converting the GTR into the street-legal version. It is not the first time that the after-market firm has converted track-only McLaren vehicles into street-legal models. The converted models are then sold to customers in Japan, the US, UK and the UAE.

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The car is powered by a 3.8L twin-turbo engine and is significantly lighter than the P1 GTR on which it is based. The P1 LM engine outputs 986bhp and 1000ps. There are only five units of the McLaren P1 LM in the world.

READ ALSO: Top 10 most expensive cars in the world 2019

4. Lamborghini Veneno Roadster: $4.5 million

According to Lamborghini, driving the Veneno ‘will feel like flying on the road’. The car’s name is Spanish for venom and true to its name, the vehicle looks stunningly menacing. The Veneno was designed as a commemoration of Lamborghini’s fifty years in operation. Under the hood, there is a 6.5L V12 engine coupled to a seven-speed manual gearbox.

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The engine produces 740hp and propels the Veneno from 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds. For exclusivity, the company manufactured only nine units of the model. The Veneno will almost always appear on most expensive car lists.

3. Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita: $4.8 million

Trevita is Swedish for ‘three whites’. The name comes from the nice carbon fibre weave pattern on the car’s bodywork. Using unique technology, Koenigsegg was able to achieve a diamond finish on the car’s carbon fibre surface. When sunshine hits the car’s surface, it seems like countless diamonds are embedded inside the car’s bodywork.

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The vehicle is powered by an aluminium 4.8L V8 engine which outputs 1018hp at 7000rpm. The car can accelerate from 0-100 km/h in 2.9 seconds, placing it among the fastest accelerating production cars today. The Trevita’s top speed is capped at 410km/h. The manufacturer only made two units of this model, making it one of the rarest sports cars ever made.

2. Mercedes-Benz Maybach Exelero: $8 million

Which car is the most expensive in the world 2018? Short answer, the Maybach Exelero. The Exelero is the perfect blend of the most luxurious coupe and the sharpest sports car. The Maybach Exelero is powered by a 5.9L twin-turbo V12 engine that outputs 700hp at 5000rpm. Despite its age, the car still looks strikingly modern even today. According to Topspeed, rapper Birdman purchased the Exelero for $8 million. The Exelero was the most expensive car in the world 2018 before the introduction of the Bugatti La Voiture Noir.

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Now that we are done with the second most expensive model, which car is the most expensive in the world?

1. Bugatti La Voiture Noir: $12.5 million (before tax)

The La Voiture Noir tops the top 20 most expensive cars list. As one can tell from this top 20 list, Bugatti makes some quite costly sports cars. However, none of those models can come close to the price point of the Bugatti La Voiture Noir. It is the most expensive car in the world 2019 with an asking price of more than $18 million (after-tax). This also makes it the most expensive car in the world of all time (new vehicle).

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According to the company, only one of these will be made and sold. Who owns the most expensive car in the world? Well, Bugatti has not revealed the identity of the La Voiture Noir buyer, but as you can guess, it must be someone who is quite rich and perhaps a prior relationship with the brand. The car’s name loosely translates to ‘black car’.

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It is undeniable that the most expensive sports cars 2019 are also strikingly beautiful. While some people are lucky to come across some of them on the streets, fewer people have the luxury of owning these sports cars. The limited production quantities, as well as the substantial asking prices, have kept most people from owning these machines. Which of the vehicles fascinated you most?

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